Bob the Dog


Facebook Chronicles: Part 3

posted Sep 5, 2009
Bob the Dog - Facebook Chronicles: Part 3 (facebook, mark zuckerberg, ant)
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by L.S.Erhardt on 9/5/2009 @ 8:42pm


Wha? I don't get it.

by NineInchNachos on 9/6/2009 @ 9:10am
ant needs to read this I cringely column titled: Dont be a facebook whore:

www.cringely.com/2008/12/dont-be-a-faceb...

by NineInchNachos on 9/6/2009 @ 12:56pm


consumerist.com/5352473/quiz-yourself-ab...

by Mofo from the Hood on 9/6/2009 @ 12:56pm
Maybe the creator of Facebook, Mr. Zuckerberg, who keeps a personal distance from his works, shares something with moviemaker Steven Spielberg. Spielberg will make movies for the general public, like Jurassic Park, but he won't allow his own children to view them. What does that say about Z & S's motive for production?–Financial incentive is a powerful motivator, though not necessarily a right motive to produce? Another way to say this is, "What have Zuckerberg and Spielberg produced, and why?

There's a broad public with an insatiable hunger for amusement and entertainment, and things that excite the emotions and feelings. Toward that end, productions by the likes of Zuckerberg and Spielberg are rewarded financially in relation to their ability to target that universal want, as distinguished from universal need.

Zuckerberg and Spielberg can reject their own productions because they understand the difference between a want and a need; the difference between garbage and nourishment.

I'm not saying that Facebook or Jurassic Park are clearly garbage; not all distinctions are clearly black and white. In these two examples one must try to see them in the context of the history of human communication and its ends. Do Facebook and Jurassic Park have a universal value in relation to human history?

I read the Cringely link noted by NIN and the blog responses include several commentators who believe that Facebook may be a passing fad–much like a popular sensational movie. Once people get over the initial thrill of the novelty they move on to the next new thrill to satisfy the insatiable hunger for amusement and entertainment, and things that excite the emotions and feelings.

Facebook and movies like Jurassic Park are produced to satisfy a want, an insatiable and fleeting hunger.

Do Zuckerberg or Spielberg's productions have any true value, or if you like, nourishing quality? For Zuckerberg and Spielberg, in relation to their personal lives, their respective productions, Facebook and Jurassic Park, beyond a financial reward, have no apparent true value.